FOCUS Advanced Manufacturing & Automation Team Helps Business Owners

Posted on December 5, 2017

Washington, DC (November 28, 2017) – The world is experiencing a period of unprecedented change as digital connectivity and automation pervade the physical universe of people and things. FOCUS Investment  Banking LLC formed the Advanced  Manufacturing  & AutomationTeam to provide merger, acquisition and capital raising services to businesses affected by this transformation and to support firms supplying the specific tools and technologies driving the innovations.

The FOCUS Advanced Manufacturing & Automation Team currently is pursuing transactions in industries ranging from robotics and industrial automation to autonomous commercial vehicles; from advanced photonics and optics to electronic component manufacturing; from machining and metal engineering to Ag Tech.

The FOCUS team is composed of 15 professionals, including investment bankers, senior advisors, and research analysts. Team members were selected for their deep vertical expertise as both C-Level executives and dealmakers in fields driving — and impacted by — automation. These areas include manufacturing, process automation, software systems, aerospace, defense, logistics, and medical devices and instrumentation. International transaction support is provided by FOCUS’ global partner firms in M&A Worldwide.

For more information, contact John Slater, FOCUS Partner and Team Leader, FOCUS Advanced Manufacturing & Automation Team, at 901-684-1274 or John.slater@focusbankers.com.

About FOCUS Investment Banking LLC  

With more than three decades  of experience,  FOCUS Investment Banking is a trusted name in M&A advisory services worldwide.  FOCUS works to understand each client’s strategic and financial objectives, craft the best plan to achieve these goals, and deliver success. Whether helping to sell, buy, or raise capital, FOCUS strives to maximize the value of every transaction to the benefit of its clients. Securities transactions  conducted  by FOCUS Securities LLC, an affiliated company, registered Broker Dealer member FINRA/SIPC. For more information on FOCUS, visit www.focusbankers.com/automation.

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Is Industry 4.0 the New DotCom Boom?

Posted on April 3, 2017

Fear stalks the land.  The Robot Apocalypse is nigh, destined to steal our jobs and our future.  Worse yet the machines are made elsewhere (Germany, Japan, even China) and America is being left behind in the race for manufacturing prowess.

We’ve heard this story before.  In the late 1980s, the U. S. computer memory industry had been decimated by Japanese and Korean competition.  To the Cassandras, this meant that the U.S. had forever lost the global economic race and was destined to become a second-rate power.

Nothing could have been further from the truth.  The prerequisites for U.S. global dominance of the technology world were already in place.  Within a few years, U.S. prowess in personal computers, microprocessors, and digital networking would lead to a capital investment boom and a stock market bubble not experienced since the 1920s.  Stock market fluctuations notwithstanding, the global growth of the Internet has not abated since.

For all its impact, the Internet has touched only a relatively small portion of human existence, focused primarily on media, entertainment, telecom and more recently retailing and finance.  The larger world in which we live, the world of things and physical interactions has, until now, been only lightly touched.  But that is going to change – and change in a huge way.

Imagine Amazon on Steroids

The world of digital automation is at the same stage as the internet in 1993, when the Mosaic browser was introduced and we first discovered the wonders of the World Wide Web.  The technologies are in place for a boom that will transform the global economy and, in the process, create new opportunities for better jobs and better lives.  And once again the U.S. is asserting its leadership role in developing the critical technologies.

Today Amazon utilizes highly advanced predictive analytics and automation tools that plan … read the rest

Why is 20 % of the American Workforce Unemployed?

Posted on September 25, 2012

Originally Published at Global Economic Intersection under the title Buddy Can You Spare a Dime?

Written by , Capital Matters

Republicans are heartless monsters who have no compassion for the victims of a financial crash they caused by manipulating Wall Street.”

Democrats are committed to destroy the American system by redistributing the hard-earned products and services of America’s businesses to shiftless moochers.”

duel-chipmunks-360x361

Wow, are we making progress in the current political debate!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Follow up:

Cyclical or Structural?

For economists the discussion revolves around a more civil discourse on whether the current high level of unemployment results from a severe cyclical downturn or from a structural change in the American economy. The Federal Reserve has forcefully adopted the cyclical downturn mantra, committing $500 billion per year to the assumption that, with more financial stimulus, the jobs will come back.

Buffalo Springfield’s insight from the 1960s is still valid:

I think it’s time we stop, hey, what’s that sound?
Everybody look what’s going down
What a field day for the heat
A thousand people in the street
Singing songs and carrying signs
Mostly say, hooray for our side

A Big Bet With Millions of Human Poker Chips

We are in the process of making an enormous bet with the American economy. The risks are not trivial: inflation, deflation, financial and social collapse are just a few. Yet what if this bet is being made based upon a misunderstanding of the problem with which we are faced.

Steven Hansen recently produced a rather depressing chart showing that, despite a period of steady economic recovery, civilian employment in relation to population flatlined beginning in late 2009, after a very sharp drop from 63% to 58% during the financial crisis.

employment-population-ratio-2007-2012

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