FOCUS Advanced Manufacturing & Automation Team Helps Business Owners

Posted on December 5, 2017

Washington, DC (November 28, 2017) – The world is experiencing a period of unprecedented change as digital connectivity and automation pervade the physical universe of people and things. FOCUS Investment  Banking LLC formed the Advanced  Manufacturing  & AutomationTeam to provide merger, acquisition and capital raising services to businesses affected by this transformation and to support firms supplying the specific tools and technologies driving the innovations.

The FOCUS Advanced Manufacturing & Automation Team currently is pursuing transactions in industries ranging from robotics and industrial automation to autonomous commercial vehicles; from advanced photonics and optics to electronic component manufacturing; from machining and metal engineering to Ag Tech.

The FOCUS team is composed of 15 professionals, including investment bankers, senior advisors, and research analysts. Team members were selected for their deep vertical expertise as both C-Level executives and dealmakers in fields driving — and impacted by — automation. These areas include manufacturing, process automation, software systems, aerospace, defense, logistics, and medical devices and instrumentation. International transaction support is provided by FOCUS’ global partner firms in M&A Worldwide.

For more information, contact John Slater, FOCUS Partner and Team Leader, FOCUS Advanced Manufacturing & Automation Team, at 901-684-1274 or John.slater@focusbankers.com.

About FOCUS Investment Banking LLC  

With more than three decades  of experience,  FOCUS Investment Banking is a trusted name in M&A advisory services worldwide.  FOCUS works to understand each client’s strategic and financial objectives, craft the best plan to achieve these goals, and deliver success. Whether helping to sell, buy, or raise capital, FOCUS strives to maximize the value of every transaction to the benefit of its clients. Securities transactions  conducted  by FOCUS Securities LLC, an affiliated company, registered Broker Dealer member FINRA/SIPC. For more information on FOCUS, visit www.focusbankers.com/automation.

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The Work World Is Changing and Society Needs To Change As Well

Posted on November 5, 2017

Written by John Slater

co-authored by Steven Hansen

We live in a time of great paradox. Technologies such as low cost renewable energy and automated
production tools promise a world of abundance in which global poverty is abolished and human
drudgery is eliminated. Yet even a casual glance at the daily news confronts us with a sense of
dread that, far from Utopia, we are instead headed toward a dystopian future in which the benefits of
technological advance will be reserved for a privileged few.

The disquieting consequence is that the bulk of humanity is relegated to scraping out a meager
existence in a mean-spirited world where jobs (and the prosperity they bring) are reserved for a
global elite trained to read the sacred texts of a new religion of technology.

Is the social contract of Western civilization, promising fair treatment and opportunity for all, which
took root in 18th century England and France and flowered in the post WWII democracies, destined
to fail? Just how will the world adapt to the current wave of technological advance which threatens
the jobs of today’s middle class much as Mr. McCormick’s reaper drove earlier generations from the
farms and into the factories of a prior era?

Econintersect has asked two contributors, John Slater and Steven Hansen, to discuss some aspects
of this conundrum concerning how and where automation and robotics will impact the new economy
and how social institutions, specifically education, can address these challenges.


John Slater is a Partner of FOCUS Investment Banking and Team Leader of the firm’s Advanced
Manufacturing and Automation practice, providing merger and acquisition and capital raising
services primarily for private middle market companies. He is a Chartered Financial Analyst and
holds an AB in economics from Princeton and a JD from the University of Virginia.

Steven Hansen, co-founder and Publisher … read the rest

Made in America: The 33 Cent Chinese Arkansas T-Shirt

Posted on October 3, 2017

Recently my colleague Marco Chan shared an extraordinary story that puts a new slant on the public discussion about robotics, China, outsourcing and the future of jobs.  According to this Bloomberg Business Week story,  a Chinese manufacturer, Tianyuan Garments Co., is investing $20 million to open a plant in Little Rock that will utilize robots developed by a Georgia company, Software Automation, to manufacture T-Shirts at a cost of 33 cents per shirt.  Each SEWBOT™ workline is capable of spitting out a T-Shirt every 26 seconds.  Human workers don’t stand a chance against such competition, no matter how low a wage rate they are willing to accept.

We’re in a period of profound change as digital technologies promise to transform virtually every industry globally.  In manufacturing this rapidly accelerating transformation will impact employers and employees alike.  PWC recently estimated that 38% of U.S. jobs could be taken by robots by 2030.  Futurists like Martin Ford and even well-known industrialists like Elon Musk have begun to argue that we need to consider adoption of a Universal Basic Income to address a world in which machines and artificial intelligence have replaced human beings in a large part of the economy.

For those that fear the consequences of automation, the connection has been broken between technological advance and the creation of new higher skilled jobs categories to replace the old lower skilled jobs.  I have more confidence that a dynamic economy will continue to provide opportunities for our citizens, creating currently unimaginable job categories for those willing and able to adapt.  Lifetime learning has become a survival skill in our society, opening up new business opportunities in education and training and likely creating hundreds of thousands of jobs in the process.

At the FOCUS Investment Banking Advanced Manufacturing & Automation Team we spend our time addressing … read the rest