Citigroup Changes Reflect Banking Industry in Transition

Posted on December 6, 2012

John M. Mason

Banking, in the past, has always been about people. Banking was built up around customer relationships and you had to have people to create customer relationships.

Bank of America (BAC) has about 275,000 employees; Wells Fargo (WFC) has some 265,000; JPMorgan Chase (JPM) has about 260,000; and Citigroup (C) also has around 260,000 employees.

Banks needed people to relate to their customers, to entertain their customers, to solve problems for their customers and to smile at their customers. People, we were told, were the “face” of the bank.

But, observers of the actions taken by Citigroup argue that this is only the first step, according to a piece in the Wall Street Journal, the “opening salvo in a wave of cutbacks, business sales and other moves that could reduce the company’s global reach.” In another article in the Journal it is argued that this move “had better not turn out to be the whole show. Citi still needs reinvention.”

Departments need to go. Subsidiaries need to go. And, so on and so forth. The bank needs to be structured for the twenty-first century.

I certainly agree that commercial banks need to restructure. And, I certainly agree that banks need to become less of a “people” business. But, this is all a part of the evolution of the banking industry.

Let me begin with a true story.

In 1972, I joined the faculty of the Finance Department of the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. This department was one of the leaders in the “new wave” of financial research talking about “betas” and the “CAPM model” and other such exotic topics of the time.

My background was banking and there were no courses at the time at Wharton about the management or … read the rest

November 2012 Capital Matters Newsletter

Posted on November 21, 2012

 Will 2013 Witness a Mergers and Acquisitions Boom?

The market for mergers and acquisitions is highly cyclical. After more than 25 years in the business we have seen a lot of ups and downs. Certainly the last 5 years witnessed one of the sharpest declines we’ve witnessed.

Source: Pitchbook

However, recent developments lead us to believe that we could be quickly moving into a period of very rapid recovery that will take the M&A market to new highs both in terms of deal volume and valuations.

In our last newsletter we presented evidence that valuations for good middle-market companies have approached the heady levels seen in the mid 2000s.  Since then we have seen tangible evidence that transaction volume is increasing as well:

•    Axial Market is the leading transaction listing service for middle market M&A transactions.  Axial recently reported a very strong rise in new deal listings in for October 2012

Source: Axialmarket

•    Andrew Ross Sorkin recently publish an article in the New York Times entitled More Money Than They Know What To Do With indicating that the largest private equity firms are expected to become much more aggressive in bidding for mega deals to use their “dry powder” of committed, but unexpended investment funds.  Sorkin indicates that $200 billion of committed capital must be spent over the next twelve months or returned to investors.  As a result he reports that private equity deal volume jumped from $17.1 billion in Q2 2012 to $45 billion in Q3 and that purchase price multiples have jumped in 2012 to 10.6 times EBITDA from 10.3 times EBITDA in 2011.

•    In our own practice we have recently experienced a competitive aggressiveness reminiscent of 2005-2007 between private equity firms competing to buy a large building products distributor that suffered tremendously during the crash, but has recently … read the rest

Categories: Banking, Investment Banking, Mergers and Acquisitions, Middle Market, Monthly Newsletters, Private Equity

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The Bankers Are Way Ahead Of The Regulators

Posted on November 20, 2012

The Financial Stability Board (FSB), a global financial policy group comprised of regulators and central bankers, just released new information on the status of the “shadow banking” industry. First, the FSB reported that from 2002 through 2011 the shadow banking industry grew by $41 trillion. Second, the shadow banking industry now is estimated to have $67 trillion in assets.

Note, as of November 7, 2012, the Federal Reserve H.8 statistical release shows that the total assets of all commercial banks in the United States amounts to a little less than $13 trillion. Third, the United States has the largest amount of shadow banking assets in the world, about $23 trillion.

Note, the share of activity based in the United States “has decline from 44 percent in 2005 to 35 percent in 2011.” The eurozone has $22 trillion in assets while Great Britain has $9 trillion.

What is a shadow bank? Lord Adair Turner, the U.K. regulator that led the FSBs work stated, “If it looks like a bank and quacks like a bank, it has got to be subject to bank-like safe-guards.” So, shadow banking is like pornography, it is what is in the eye of the beholder … in this case the regulator. It looks, therefore, as if we are in for another major round of rules and regulation for the finance industry … worldwide!

Looking for a job? I have seen many, many references to the health industry as the place to be if you want to get employed over the next decade or so. Looks to me like we have another growth industry here! If you want to get employed in a good steady job for an extended period of time become a regulator of the financial industry. Sounds like there are going to be plenty of jobs available and … read the rest

Evolving Financial Institutions

Posted on November 20, 2012

So much of the world is in transition, why do people want the commercial banking industry to be what it was many years ago? This is just not going to happen.

As I have written many, many times, finance is information! We have seen, over the past fifty years or so how the advancements in information technology have contributed, for better or worse, to the innovations that have taken place in financial institutions and financial instruments.

Given the continuing advancements in the information technology field how can we not expect the financial field to continue to evolve? Check out all that is being done in mobile banking these days. At least in my area of the world I am seeing more and more advertisements about mobile banking and what it does for the customer.

And, this is just the ground level. More and more people you talk with and read about claim that they have only gone into a bank office once or twice in the past two or three years. And, the only reason they went into the bank was to complain about not receiving notifications from the bank that their interest rates were being dropped. If this is not enough, read David Wolman’s book, “The End of Money” (Da Capo Press, 2012).

But, who is going to even keep their money in a typical commercial bank? I don’t. I work with an institution that satisfies my banking needs and ties all my financial relationships together so that I can move seamlessly from one asset class to another almost instantaneously.

How about my mortgage? (Yes, I have one!) The commercial bank I know set me up with their affiliated mortgage that immediately sold the mortgage to Wells Fargo (WFC), which now just services the loan because it is owned by Fannie … read the rest

August 2012 – The Future of Small Business Financing

Posted on August 23, 2012

Everyone loves small business.

At least that’s what the politicians want you to believe.

The reality is different. Small business is under attack from every quarter. Government policies favor large banks and large multinational businesses. Credit is tight and the banks favor the larger borrowers. Increased regulations stifle innovation and protect large incumbents that can afford teams of lawyers and lobbyists.

What’s the little guy to do? Waiting for the politicians to change the system is wishful thinking. Smart business people find ways to prosper in every environment.


And the current environment is not great for small firms. The Federal Reserve Senior Loan Officer survey has recently confirmed what we have suspected for some time: banks have been more generous in easing underwriting requirements for larger companies than they have been for smaller companies. Paynet, which maintains data on 17 million small business loans, reports that lending conditions for small firms have deteriorated in recent months after two years of bounce back from the 2009 bottom.  For additional details go to the full article on Capital Matters.


Financial Market Risk
And there’s a risk that things could get a lot worse for businesses that don’t tie down their financing soon.  We just published an article on Seeking Alpha that has received a great deal of attention with more than 14,400 page views so far. Our thesis is that the Fed’s zero interest rate policy has led to a situation where longer term treasury bonds are trading at yield levels that provide a spread to inflation far below the historical norms. Markets eventually return to their mean and often overshoot it so there is growing risk in the longer term debt market. Our concern is two-fold. First, that individual investors need to be aware of the potential impact of this return to the mean … read the rest

A Swan Blacker Than The Darkest Night

Posted on August 18, 2012

Interest Rates Rise at 2652% Annualized Rate! That’s probably a headline you will not see in the Wall Street Journal and it’s certainly a bit over the top, but those are the facts. From July 18 to August 17, the interest rate on the two-year Treasury jumped from .22% to .29%. That’s a 32% one month increase and works out to an annual jump of 2652% if you compound the increase monthly. Just to be fair the ten-year rate “only” rose from 1.52% to 1.81% or about 19% over the same period. With the magic of compound interest that generates a far more benign 713% annualized rate rise.

If you haven’t already done the math, those growth rates would take you to a 43.8% annual interest rate on the two year a year from now and a 12.9% interest rate on the ten year at that point. Of course that is not going to happen. Most likely we’ve just seen a random fluctuation in an overbought market. The Fed has promised to keep interest rates low for an extended period after all.

We’ve been saying for some time that the seeds have been planted for a move into a period of stagflation comparable to what we saw from the mid-1960’s and the 1970’s. That move, which transformed the benign inflation of the 1950’s to a raging inferno by the end of the period, eventually took Treasury rates for the 10 year to unheard of levels of 15% by the end of the 1970’s. This resulted in a collapse of the bond market and the eventual failure of entire savings and loan industry in the United States in the 1980s.

The United States and most of the developed world have benefited tremendously over the past 30 years from a steady drop in long-term bond rates.… read the rest

Financial Innovation Aids Small Business Borrowers

Posted on August 15, 2012

The most recent Federal Reserve Senior Loan Officers Survey conducted at 64 large banks confirms what we have suspected. After a long period of tightening, loan standards have stabilized and for larger borrowers they have loosened slightly. The survey provides less hope for smaller borrowers, shown in red on the chart below.

(Click on Image to enlarge)

This confirms data we published previously showing that small business lending has entered into a choppy period in 2012 after seeing moderate improvement from the 2009 lows during 2010 and 2011. Things are only likely to get worse for smaller borrowers as their natural allies, the community banks, struggle with maturing underwater CRE (commercial real estate) loans, continued pressure from their regulators and rapid industry consolidation.

FDIC data shows that bank credit availability is likely deteriorating for many cash starved small businesses. From December 31, 2010 to March 31, 2012, C&I (commercial and industrial) loans at banks over $1 Billion, i.e. those that focus on lending to large multinationals and mid-sized domestic firms, grew approximately 20% from $1 Trillion to $1.2 Trillion. For banks under $1 Billion, i.e. those most focused on small business lending, C&I  loans actually dropped 6% during the period from $110 Billion to $103.5 Billion.

We increasingly see smaller firms struggle to obtain funding if they do not have adequate hard collateral (equipment, inventory or receivables) or if the owners don’t have personal assets to pledge to support the loans. If you are a small business with a capital need to support a growing business, you’re asking “what options do I have?” Recently some innovative non-bank financial services firms have stepped into the breach and are beginning to offer new forms of small business finance based not on specific collateral, balance sheets or income statements, but on a company’s proven ability to generate … read the rest

QE Anyone?

Posted on August 10, 2012

If anyone doubts we are moving to more monetary accommodation, take a look at the excerpt below from last night’s U.S. Financial Data release from the St. Louis Fed. The lower right hand corner reflects the most recent trends.

In June, we posted an article indicating a seeming correlation between the trend in direction and magnitude of U.S. M2 growth and U.S. economic activity. The decline in the M2 growth rate has now turned, and is headed up again, as you can see below, but the turn is not as dramatic as the growth in the Monetary Base.

We’ve previously stated our concern that the U.S. could be heading into a period of rapidly increasing inflation, similar to that experienced in the early 1970s that led to many years of stagflation, only ending with Mr. Volcker’s monetary castor oil. We’ve got all the ingredients, including this summer’s rapid runup in commodity prices. The past twelve month the GDP price deflator has dropped from 2.4% to 1.9% on an annual basis, averaging a bit above the Fed’s 2% target. 2-3% is in the range where the 1970’s inflation began to take off. Yet, we’re in a period where many, if not most, observers have been talking recession and increased likelihood of deflation. Real inflation will come as a black swan for many, with significant implications for both fixed income and equity markets.

Could the current round of easing be the spark that finally ignites the inflationary flame? There are lots of reasons to suspect that’s possible. Calculated Risk just supported a growing belief that housing may finally be bottoming. Declining home prices have been a primary force that’s kept inflation in check for the past few years. Add to that a renewed commodity spiral, annual wage inflation in China hitting 13-15% and evidence that the read the rest

U. S. Small Businesses Heading Into Choppy Waters

Posted on August 9, 2012


Source: Paynet

Small business lending has grown steadily since the end of the recession.  The Thomson Reuters/PayNet index focuses on loans to borrowers with total indebtedness under $1 million.  In a related story it was reported that preliminary June data not reflected in the chart above shows a sharp 5% drop in small business lending.  The article paints a rather gloomy picture for small businesses and the economy as a whole.

PayNet President William Phelan explained, “Businesses and bankers should prepare for more slowdown. Now might be the time to consider adding capital. Credit supply is high and interest rates are incredibly low.” Phelan added “banks should strengthen credit quality to prepare for further slowdown. Stress Tests show that a full blown recession means small business failures could triple.”

According to Paynet the Thomson Reuters/PayNet Small Business Lending Index (SBLI) measures the volume of new commercial loans and leases to small businesses indexed so that January 2005 equals 100.  Because small businesses generally respond to changes in economic conditions more rapidly than larger businesses do, the SBLI serves as a leading indicator of the economy. The index is a highly correlated leading indicator of the GDP by 2 to 5 months.

There is some good news in the report.  Small businesses have been steadily improving their balance sheets since the beginning of the recession and loan delinquencies are at historically very low levels, with severe delinquencies much lower than 2005 the first year for which data is available.  However, the report goes on to say that small business investment rates are lower than in 2005 as companies pay down debt and build cash.  Banks are under-loaned with loan to deposit ratios of 60-70% and are competing hard for the few high quality loans that are available.  While businesses are being cautious in this difficult … read the rest

The JOBS Act and the Future of Commercial Banking

Posted on June 12, 2012

America needs jobs!   That’s a point where there is universal agreement among the political parties.  So much so that Congress overwhelmingly passed the Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act; 390 to 23 in the House and 73 to 26 in the Senate.  My suspicion is the most of those voting for the Act had little idea of how far-reaching the effects of the JOBS Act might be.

The JOBS Act may represent the most radical change in how securities can be privately sold and business capital can be raised from private investors since the securities laws were passed in the 1930s.  Under the JOBS Act most of the restrictions with regard to solicitation that have impeded the growth of a vibrant private placement capital market among accredited investors (i.e. those with liquid net worth over $1 million or incomes over $200,000) have now been removed.

The devil is always in the details and SEC regulations promulgated under the Act could potentially curtail some of its impact.  As written, the JOBS Act has the potential to democratize the financing of business growth in a very dramatic and potentially unintended manner.  By removing many, if not most, of the restrictions on accredited investors seeking to invest in small companies, the JOBS Act provides a basis for many innovative new vehicles for small business financing to blossom.

While most of the commentary around the JOBS Act focuses on funding of startups, the real financing need is to support the expansion of the rapidly growing mid-sized companies that, according to the National Bureau of Economic Research, provide the engine for new jobs in America.  These companies typically have progressed past the startup stage.  They may have 20-50 employees and several million dollars of revenue, with the potential to grow to hundreds if not thousands of employees as … read the rest

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